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An overview and example of Bioluminescence

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by CrayCray, May 11, 2017.

  1. CrayCray

    CrayCray OMG Member

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    Bioluminescence is the name given to the phenomenon of a living organism producing light through a series of chemical reactions. This bioluminescence is found most commonly in marine species; however, it is also found in some land-dwelling species, including fireflies and some types of fungus. Bioluminescence has been observed and documented as long ago as 342 BCE in a book written by the philosopher Aristotle. As ocean exploration became more common in the 16th century, there were many more accounts made of witnessing bioluminescence in the seas.

    Some notable marine species that exhibit bioluminescence include Lanternfish, Marine hatchetfish, and Viperfish. Lanternfish are between 2 and 30 centimeters long, and occur between 300 and 1,500 meters’ depth in the ocean, rising to between 10 and 100 meters’ depth during the night to avoid predators and follow their prey, Zooplankton. The Marine hatchetfish ranges in size from 3 centimeters to 12 centimeters long, getting its name from the hatchet-like shape of its body. Their range of ocean depth is from 50 to 1,500 meters below the surface. The Viperfish ranges in depth from 80 to 1,520 meters and is between 30 and 60 centimeters long, making it larger than most bioluminescent fish of similar oceanic depth.

    Although bioluminescence is somewhat common in the depths of the ocean, scientists are not entirely sure of its purpose. Bioluminescent organisms in the deep seas are difficult to study or observe. This is because of several different factors, including that shining lights on these species to observe them can frighten then away and blind them.
     
  2. Floris

    Floris I'm just me :) Hi. Staff Member

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    I wouldn't mind if my drinks had a healthy algae in them that light up in the dark when light reflects on it, so my kitchen had a much cooler looking bar :P

    And I think that's one of the important things when it comes to science, to get the public involved and have us understand it better what we're dealing with and have a voice in it.

    The computer didn't get much popular until it became a consumer product (basically).
     
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